Belton House, Lincolnshire, East Midlands
© Niko S90 on Flickr
Boston Stump, Lincolnshire, East Midlands
© Niko S90 on Flickr
Burghley House, Lincolnshire, East Midlands
© Niko S90 on Flickr
Lincoln Cathedral, Lincolnshire, East Midlands
© Niko S90 on Flickr
Maud Foster Windmill, Boston, Lincolnshire, East Midlands
© Niko S90 on Flickr
Woolsthorpe Manor, Lincolnshire, East Midlands
© Manfred 960 on Flickr

East Midlands

Organisation colours:      NT      EH      HHA      Council, or privately owned     
  • Alford Windmill

    Alford Windmill, Lincolnshire, East Midlands

    Windmill

    Alford Windmill is a five-sailed windmill in Alford, Lincolnshire, and the only surviving windmill out of four.

    East Midlands - Lincolnshire, Alford

    Alford Windmill is a five-sailed windmill in Alford, Lincolnshire, and the only surviving windmill out of four.

    Alford Windmill is a seven-storeyed Lincolnshire-type tower windmill with a stage – featuring a slender, tapering brick tower, tarred to keep the moisture out, covered with a white onion-shaped (ogee) cap with fan-stage, huge fantail, and white sails. She has five patent-shutter sails and originally three, later four, pairs of stones (two pairs of grey or peak stones (cut from rock found in the Peak District) and two French "quartzite" stones).

    Today, the windmill has been restored to working order, and grinds grain to organic flour. It is open as a tourist attraction.

    Built as a seven-storeyed windmill in 1837 by the well-known local millwright John Oxley, the mill belonged to a group of four windmills and is the sole survivor, today. At the end of the 19th to the beginning of the 20th century, Alford featured a four-sailed mill (Wallace's OR Station Mill, now a stump), a five-sailed windmill (Hoyles's Windmill, today's Alford Mill), and a six-sailer (the now dismantled (in 1973) six-storeyed Myers's Windmill, built in 1827 with six left-handed sails, and also called the Alford Mill) as the only place in Lincolnshire beside Horncastle.

    (National Mills Weekend 2019: Saturday 11th and Sunday 12th of May)
    (Please, always check if the mill is open to the public before your visit.)

     


  • Althorp

    Althorp, Northamptonshire, East Midlands

    Historic House

    Althorp is a Grade-I-listed stately home, estate and small civil parish in Daventry District, Northamptonshire, England.

    East Midlands - Northamptonshire, Northampton

    Althorp is a Grade-I-listed stately home, estate and small civil parish in Daventry District, Northamptonshire, England.

    It has been held by the prominent aristocratic Spencer family for over 500 years, and has been owned by Charles Spencer, 9th Earl Spencer since 1992. It was also the home of his sister, Diana, before her marriage to Charles, Prince of Wales.


     


  • Apethorpe Palace - (EH)

    Apethorpe Palace, Northamptonshire, East Midlands

    Palace

    ountry house dating back to the 15th century; it was "favourite royal residence" for James I. Apethorpe is pronounced 'Ap-thorp'. The main house is built around three courtyards lying on an east–west axis and is approximately 80,000 square feet (7450 m2) in area. It is acknowledged as one of the finest Jacobean stately homes in England, and was the main seat of the Fane family, Earls of Westmorland.

    Apethorpe holds a particularly important place in English history because of its ownership by, and role in entertaining, Tudor and Stuart monarchs. Elizabeth I inherited the palace from her father Henry VIII. Her successor, James I, personally contributed to its extension, resulting in a set of impressive state rooms, featuring some of the most important surviving plasterwork and fireplaces of the period. There were at least thirteen extended royal visits - more than to any other house in the county - between 1566 and 1636, and it was at Apethorpe that James met George Villiers, his favourite, later to become Duke of Buckingham. A series of court masques written by Ben Jonson for James I were performed while the King was in residence at Apethorpe. The palace was also lived in regularly by Charles I.

    East Midlands - Northamptonshire, Apethorpe

    Apethorpe Palace, formerly known as Apethorpe Hall, Apethorpe House or Apthorp Park, in Apethorpe, Northamptonshire, England, is a Grade-I-listed country house dating back to the 15th century; it was "favourite royal residence" for James I. Apethorpe is pronounced 'Ap-thorp'. The main house is built around three courtyards lying on an east–west axis and is approximately 80,000 square feet (7450 m2) in area. It is acknowledged as one of the finest Jacobean stately homes in England, and was the main seat of the Fane family, Earls of Westmorland.

    Apethorpe holds a particularly important place in English history because of its ownership by, and role in entertaining, Tudor and Stuart monarchs. Elizabeth I inherited the palace from her father Henry VIII. Her successor, James I, personally contributed to its extension, resulting in a set of impressive state rooms, featuring some of the most important surviving plasterwork and fireplaces of the period. There were at least thirteen extended royal visits - more than to any other house in the county - between 1566 and 1636, and it was at Apethorpe that James met George Villiers, his favourite, later to become Duke of Buckingham. A series of court masques written by Ben Jonson for James I were performed while the King was in residence at Apethorpe. The palace was also lived in regularly by Charles I.

    .. more

     


  • Arbor Low Stone Circle & Gib Hill Barrow - (EH)

    Arbor Low Stone Circle and Gib Hill Barrow, Derbyshire, East Midlands

    Stone Circle

    Arbor Low is a Neolithic henge monument in the Peak District, Derbyshire, England.

    East Midlands - Derbyshire

    Arbor Low is a Neolithic henge monument in the Peak District, Derbyshire, England.

    The most important prehistoric site of the East Midlands, Arbor Low is a Neolithic henge monument atmospherically set amid high moorland.

    Arbor Low consists of about 50 large limestone blocks, quarried from a local site, which form an egg-shaped circle, with monoliths at the entrances and possibly a portal stone at the south entrance. Nearby is the enigmatic Gib Hill, a large burial mound.

    Please note: Dogs on leads are welcome.



     


  • Ashby de la Zouch Castle - (EH), (fragmented ruins)

    Ashby de la Zouch Castle, Leicestershire, East Midlands

    Castle

    Ashby-de-la-Zouch Castle is in the town of Ashby-de-la-Zouch, Leicestershire, England.

    East Midlands - Leicestershire, Ashby de la Zouch

    Ashby-de-la-Zouch Castle is in the town of Ashby-de-la-Zouch, Leicestershire, England.

    The site originated as a Norman fortified manor house in the 12th century, founded by Alain de Parrhoet, la Zouch, out of Breton, France. During the next three centuries it was extended by his descendants, but after the Zouch succession line ended in the 14th century, the castle changed ownership many times. In 1461, the castle reverted to the Crown after the then owner James Butler, the 5th Earl of Ormonde, was executed after the Battle of Towton.

    Visitors can still climb the tower today, despite it suffering massive damage during the Civil War. There are great views from the top! Then make sure you discover the underground passage from the kitchen to the tower, probably created during this war, which can still be explored today.

    Although there is some parking available on site free of charge, it is restricted. Visitors are therefore advised to park in the town car park when driving to the castle (charges apply).