Hardwick Hall, Derbyshire, East Midlands
© Chachu207 (CC)
Kedleston Hall, Derbyshire, East Midlands
© Hans A. Rosbach (CC)

Derbyshire

(Deorbyscir)
Organisation colours:      NT      EH      HHA      Council, or privately owned     
  • Arbor Low Stone Circle & Gib Hill Barrow - (EH)

    Arbor Low Stone Circle and Gib Hill Barrow, Derbyshire, East Midlands

    Stone Circle

    Arbor Low is a Neolithic henge monument in the Peak District, Derbyshire, England.

    East Midlands - Derbyshire

    Arbor Low is a Neolithic henge monument in the Peak District, Derbyshire, England.

    The most important prehistoric site of the East Midlands, Arbor Low is a Neolithic henge monument atmospherically set amid high moorland.

    Arbor Low consists of about 50 large limestone blocks, quarried from a local site, which form an egg-shaped circle, with monoliths at the entrances and possibly a portal stone at the south entrance. Nearby is the enigmatic Gib Hill, a large burial mound.

    Please note: Dogs on leads are welcome.



     


  • Bolsover Castle - (EH), (rebuilt)

    Bolsover Castle, Derbyshire, East Midlands

    Castle

    Bolsover Castle is a castle in Bolsover, Derbyshire, England.

    East Midlands - Derbyshire, Bolsover

    Bolsover Castle is a castle in Bolsover, Derbyshire, England.

    It was founded in the 12th century by the Peverel family, who also owned Peveril Castle in Derbyshire, and came under royal control in 1155. The site is now in the care of English Heritage and is a Grade-I-listed building and a Scheduled Ancient Monument.

    A castle was built by the Peverel family in the 12th century and became Crown property in 1155 when William Peverel the Younger died. The Ferrers family, who were Earls of Derby, laid claim to the Peveril property.

    When a group of barons, led by King Henry II's sons – Henry the Young King, Geoffrey Duke of Brittany and Prince Richard, later Richard the Lionheart – revolted against the king's rule, Henry spent £116 on building work at the castles of Bolsover and Peveril in Derbyshire.



     


  • Calke Abbey - (NT)

    Calke Abbey, Derbyshire, East Midlands

    Country House

    Calke Abbey is a Grade-I-listed country house near Ticknall, Derbyshire, England, in the care of the charitable National Trust.

    East Midlands - Derbyshire, Derby

    Calke Abbey is a Grade-I-listed country house near Ticknall, Derbyshire, England, in the care of the charitable National Trust.

    The site was an Augustinian priory from the 12th century until its dissolution by Henry VIII. The present building, named Calke Abbey in 1808, was never actually an abbey, but is a baroque mansion built between 1701 and 1704.

    The house was owned by the Harpur family for nearly 300 years, until it was passed to the Trust in 1985 in lieu of death duties. Today, the house is open to the public, and many of its rooms are deliberately displayed in the state of decline in which the house was handed to the Trust.



     


  • Casterne Hall - (HHA)

    Casterne Hall, Derbyshire, East Midlands

    Historic House

    d.

    It is the home of the Hurt family, who have owned the land since the mid-16th century.

    The grange at Castern was owned by Burton Abbey until the Dissolution of the Monasteries. It was acquired by Roger Hurt, youngest son of Nicholas Hurt of Ashbourne, who settled there in the mid-16th century. Later, Nicholas Hurt (1649-1711) married the heiress of Alderwasley, and in time Alderwasley Hall became the family's principal residence.#more

    There have also been several films made here:
    Jane Eyre (BBC 1983)
    Sherlock Holmes: The Hound of the Baskervilles (Granada 1988)
    Agatha Christie's Poirot: Hunter's Lodge (LWT 1990)
    Far from the Madding Crowd (Granada 1997)
    Jonathan Creek: Frog Hollow (BBC 1999)

    East Midlands - Derbyshire, Ashbourne, Derby

    Castern Hall, also known as Casterne Hall, is a privately owned 18th-century country house in the Manifold Valley, near Ilam, Staffordshire, England.

    It is the home of the Hurt family, who have owned the land since the mid-16th century.

    The grange at Castern was owned by Burton Abbey until the Dissolution of the Monasteries. It was acquired by Roger Hurt, youngest son of Nicholas Hurt of Ashbourne, who settled there in the mid-16th century. Later, Nicholas Hurt (1649-1711) married the heiress of Alderwasley, and in time Alderwasley Hall became the family's principal residence. .. more


     


  • Catton Hall - (HHA)

    Catton Hall, Derbyshire, East Midlands

    Historic House

    Catton Hall is a country house near the boundary between Derbyshire and Staffordshire.

    East Midlands - Derbyshire, Catton, Walton upon Trent

    Catton Hall is a country house near the boundary between Derbyshire and Staffordshire. It gives its postal address as Walton-on-Trent although there was a village of Catton at one time. It is a Grade-II-listed building.

    The Manor of Catton was acquired at the beginning of the 15th century by Roger Horton. Members of the family served as High Sheriff of Derbyshire. In the 19th century, Anne Beatrix Horton, heiress of the estate, married Robert Wilmot, thus creating the Wilmot-Horton family. On the death of the fifth Wilmot-Horton Baronet in 1887, the estate passed to his niece Augusta-Theresa who, in 1851, married the Rev. Arthur Henry Anson, rector of Potterhanworth, Lincolnshire, and son of the Hon. Rev. Frederick Anson, Dean of Chester, born at the Anson family home, Shugborough Hall.