Abbeys & Priories of Bedfordshire

(Beadafordscir)
Organisation colours:      NT      EH      HHA      Council, or privately owned     
  • Bushmead Priory - (EH)

    Bushmead Priory, Bedfordshire, East of England

    Priory

    a Hamlet in Staploe Parish) in the County of Bedfordshire in England. It is a Grade-I-listed building.

    The site and remains of the 700-year-old priory stand today neighbouring a light industrial estate and a disused airfield, and lies between the villages of Colmworth and Little Staughton. Nothing survives of the priory church, and all but the refectory and kitchen of the claustral buildings have disappeared.

    Never a large house, the community appears to have consisted of the prior and up to four canons.

    The priory was founded around 1195 by William, Chaplain of Colmworth. Hugh de Beauchamp of Eaton Socon endowed the priory with 28 acres (113,000 m²), the priory also held land around Coppingford chapel; during these early years, it also held a considerable number of Selions, given to them by local people as gifts of faith. Around 1206, King John permitted the monks to enclose and clear part of the nearby Perry woods.

    East of England - Bedfordshire, Staploe, Bedfordshire

    The Priory Church of Saint Mary, Bushmead, commonly called Bushmead Priory, was a monastic foundation for Augustinian Canons, located at Bushmead (a Hamlet in Staploe Parish) in the County of Bedfordshire in England. It is a Grade-I-listed building.

    The site and remains of the 700-year-old priory stand today neighbouring a light industrial estate and a disused airfield, and lies between the villages of Colmworth and Little Staughton. Nothing survives of the priory church, and all but the refectory and kitchen of the claustral buildings have disappeared.

    Never a large house, the community appears to have consisted of the prior and up to four canons.

    The priory was founded around 1195 by William, Chaplain of Colmworth. Hugh de Beauchamp of Eaton Socon endowed the priory with 28 acres (113,000 m²), the priory also held land around Coppingford chapel; during these early years, it also held a considerable number of Selions, given to them by local people as gifts of faith. Around 1206, King John permitted the monks to enclose and clear part of the nearby Perry woods.



     


  • Woburn Abbey - (HHA) (THoE)

    Woburn Abbey, Bedfordshire, East of England

    Country House

    Woburn Abbey occupying the east of the village of Woburn, Bedfordshire, England.

    East of England - Bedfordshire, Woburn

    Woburn Abbey occupying the east of the village of Woburn, Bedfordshire, England.

    The Abbey is a country house, the family seat of the Duke of Bedford. Although it is still a family home to the current duke, it is open on specified days to visitors, along with the diverse estate surrounding it, including the historic landscape gardens and deer park (by Humphry Repton), as well as more recently added attractions, including Woburn Safari Park, a miniature railway and a garden/visitor centre.

    Woburn Abbey, comprising Woburn Park and its buildings, was set out and founded as a Cistercian abbey in 1145. Taken from its monastic residents by Henry VIII and given to John Russell, 1st Earl of Bedford, in 1547, it became the seat of the Russell family and the Dukes of Bedford. The Abbey was largely rebuilt, starting in 1744 by the architects Henry Flitcroft and Henry Holland for the 4th Duke. Anna Maria, the wife of the 7th Duke, originated the afternoon-tea ritual in 19th-century England.

    Please be aware that photography is not permitted inside the Abbey.

    * This property is part of Treasure Houses of England
    You can pick up a leaflet called "England's Finest" which contains 2-for-price-of-1 vouchers for the other properties of this group.