The Tower of London, London
© Niko S90 on Flickr - (All rights reserved)
The Tower of London, London
© Niko S90 on Flickr - (All rights reserved)
Tower Bridge, London
© by Niko S90 on Flickr - (All rights reserved)
St. Paul's Cathedral, London
© Niko S90 on Flickr - (All rights reserved)
St. Paul's Cathedral, London
© Niko S90 on Flickr - (All rights reserved)
Tower Bridge, London
© Manfred 960 on Flickr - (All rights reserved)
The White Tower, London
© Manfred on Flickr - by Manfred 960 on Flickr - (All rights reserved)

Outer London

Organisation colours:      NT      EH      HHA      Council, or privately owned     
  • Eastbury Manor House - (NT)

    Eastbury Manor House, London

    Historic House

    Eastbury Manor House is an example of an Elizabethan building, situated in the London Borough of Barking and Dagenham in Greater London, England.

    Greater London - Barking, Essex

    Eastbury Manor House is an example of an Elizabethan building, situated in the London Borough of Barking and Dagenham in Greater London, England. The house is in the ownership of the National Trust and is open to visitors.

    The land on which Eastbury House now stands was once part of the demesne of Barking Abbey. It was built in the 1570s by a wealthy merchant, Clement Sisley, who purchased the land after the dissolution of Barking Abbey. It was probably the first brick built building in the area at that time; it had glass windows and very high chimneys, indicating the wealth of the owner. Glass was probably imported from Italy as, at that time, English glass was relatively poor in quality. A dendrochronology survey dates the timber roof to 1566 and there is documentary evidence which describes the dates 1572 carved in the brickwork and 1573 on a lead water spout indicating finishing touches to the building. Recent research has shown that, in the early 17th century, the house was in the occupation of a Catholic family with close family connections to some of the principal conspirators of the Gunpowder Plot of 1605.


     


  • Ham House and Gardens - (NT)

    Ham House & Gardens, London

    Historic House

    Ham House is situated beside the River Thames in Ham, south of Richmond in London (previously in the county of Surrey).

    Greater London - Ham, Richmond, (Surrey)

    Ham House is situated beside the River Thames in Ham, south of Richmond in London (previously in the county of Surrey).

    It is claimed by the National Trust to be "unique in Europe" as the most complete survival of 17th-century fashion and power.

    In the early 17th century, Ham was bestowed by James I to his son, Henry Frederick, Prince of Wales.

    The house was built in 1610 by Sir Thomas Vavasour, Knight Marshal to James I. It originally comprised an H-plan layout consisting of nine bays and three storeys. The Thames-side location was ideal for Vavasour, allowing him to move between the courts at Richmond, London and Windsor.

    Very unfriendly staff. A bit disappointing, only three stars.
    OK if you are a NT member, and you don't have to pay.



     


  • Hampton Court Palace

    Hampton Court Palace, London

    Historic House

    n the postal town East Molesey, Surrey.

    It has not been inhabited by the British Royal Family since the 18th century. The palace is 11.7 miles (18.8 kilometres) southwest of Charing Cross and upstream of Central London on the River Thames. It was originally built in 1514 for Cardinal Thomas Wolsey, a favourite of King Henry VIII. In 1529, as Wolsey fell from favour, the King seized the palace for himself and later enlarged it. Along with St James's Palace, it is one of only two surviving palaces out of the many owned by King Henry VIII.

    In the following century, King William III's massive rebuilding and expansion project was intended to rival Versailles. Work ceased in 1694, leaving the palace in two distinct contrasting architectural styles, domestic Tudor and Baroque. While the palace's styles are an accident of fate, a unity exists due to the use of pink bricks and a symmetrical, if vague, balancing of successive low wings.

    Greater London - East Molesey, London

    Hampton Court Palace is a royal palace in the London Borough of Richmond-upon-Thames, Greater London, previously in the County of Surrey, and within the postal town East Molesey, Surrey.

    It has not been inhabited by the British Royal Family since the 18th century. The palace is 11.7 miles (18.8 kilometres) southwest of Charing Cross and upstream of Central London on the River Thames. It was originally built in 1514 for Cardinal Thomas Wolsey, a favourite of King Henry VIII. In 1529, as Wolsey fell from favour, the King seized the palace for himself and later enlarged it. Along with St James's Palace, it is one of only two surviving palaces out of the many owned by King Henry VIII.

    In the following century, King William III's massive rebuilding and expansion project was intended to rival Versailles. Work ceased in 1694, leaving the palace in two distinct contrasting architectural styles, domestic Tudor and Baroque. While the palace's styles are an accident of fate, a unity exists due to the use of pink bricks and a symmetrical, if vague, balancing of successive low wings.


     


  • Kempton Park Steam Engines

    Kempton Park Steam Engines, London

    Steam Engine

    the Kempton Park waterworks, London.

    They were manufactured by Worthington-Simpson. Each engine is of a similar size to that used in RMS Titanic and rated at about 1008 hp. They each pumped 19 million gallons (86 million litres) of water a day, to supply north London with drinking water taken from the River Thames. They were the last working survivors when they were finally retired from service in 1980.

    The engines are of an inverted vertical triple-expansion type, 62 feet (19 m) tall from basement to the top of the valve casings, and each weighs over 800 tons. The engines are thought to be the biggest ever built in the UK.

    One of the engines, called The Sir William Prescott, has been restored to running order and is the largest fully operational triple-expansion steam engine in the world. It may be seen in steam on various weekends during the year. The engine house also houses two steam turbine water pumps.

    Greater London - Hanworth , Middlesex

    The Kempton Park Steam Engines (also known as the Kempton Great Engines) are two large triple-expansion steam engines, dating from 1926–1929, at the Kempton Park waterworks, London.

    They were manufactured by Worthington-Simpson. Each engine is of a similar size to that used in RMS Titanic and rated at about 1008 hp. They each pumped 19 million gallons (86 million litres) of water a day, to supply north London with drinking water taken from the River Thames. They were the last working survivors when they were finally retired from service in 1980.

    The engines are of an inverted vertical triple-expansion type, 62 feet (19 m) tall from basement to the top of the valve casings, and each weighs over 800 tons. The engines are thought to be the biggest ever built in the UK.

    One of the engines, called The Sir William Prescott, has been restored to running order and is the largest fully operational triple-expansion steam engine in the world. It may be seen in steam on various weekends during the year. The engine house also houses two steam turbine water pumps.


     


  • Kew Palace

    Kew Palace, London

    Historic House

    Kew Palace is a British royal palace in Kew Gardens on the banks of the Thames up river from London.

    Greater London - Richmond, Surrey

    Kew Palace is a British royal palace in Kew Gardens on the banks of the Thames up river from London. There have been at least three palaces at Kew, and two have been known as Kew Palace; the first building may not have been known as Kew as no records survive other than the words of another courtier. One palace survives, and is open to visitors. It is Grade-I-listed and cared for by an independent charity, Historic Royal Palaces, which receives no funding from the Government or the Crown.