Beningbrough Hall, North Yorkshire, North-East England
© Poliphilo (Public Domain)
Byland Abbey, North Yorkshire, North-East England
© Darren Flinders on Flickr (CC BY-ND 2.0)

Abbeys & Priories of North Yorkshire

(Eoferwicscir)
Organisation colours:      NT      EH      HHA      Council, or privately owned     
  • Byland Abbey - (EH)

    Byland Abbey, North Yorkshire, North-East England

    Abbey

    Byland Abbey is a ruined abbey and a small village in the Ryedale district of North Yorkshire, England, in the North York Moors National Park.

    North-East England - North Yorkshire, Byland, Coxwold

    Byland Abbey is a ruined abbey and a small village in the Ryedale district of North Yorkshire, England, in the North York Moors National Park.

    Impressive remains can still be seen, in the care of English Heritage, including the lower half of a huge rose window. An interesting feature is the preservation of some of the brightly coloured medieval floor tiles. An altar table was also recovered, although that is now in Ampleforth, and a stone lectern base from the chapter house is the only example of its kind in Britain.



     


  • Easby Abbey - (EH)

    Easby Abbey, North Yorkshire, North-East England

    Abbey

    e Richmondshire district of North Yorkshire, England.

    The site is maintained by English Heritage and can be reached by a riverside walk from Richmond Castle. Within the precinct is the still-active parish church, displaying 13th-century wall paintings.

    The Abbey of St. Agatha, Easby, was founded in 1152 by Roald, Constable of Richmond Castle. The inhabitants were canons rather than monks. The Premonstratensians wore a white habit and became known as the White Canons. The White Canons followed a code of austerity similar to that of Cistercian monks. Unlike monks of other orders, they were exempt from episcopal discipline. They undertook preaching and pastoral work in the region (such as distributing meat and drink).

    North-East England - North Yorkshire, Easby, Richmond

    Easby Abbey or the Abbey of St Agatha is a ruined Premonstratensian abbey on the eastern bank of the River Swale on the outskirts of Richmond in the Richmondshire district of North Yorkshire, England.

    The site is maintained by English Heritage and can be reached by a riverside walk from Richmond Castle. Within the precinct is the still-active parish church, displaying 13th-century wall paintings.

    The Abbey of St. Agatha, Easby, was founded in 1152 by Roald, Constable of Richmond Castle. The inhabitants were canons rather than monks. The Premonstratensians wore a white habit and became known as the White Canons. The White Canons followed a code of austerity similar to that of Cistercian monks. Unlike monks of other orders, they were exempt from episcopal discipline. They undertook preaching and pastoral work in the region (such as distributing meat and drink).



     


  • Fountains Abbey & Studley Royal Water Garden - (NT)

    Fountains Abbey and Studley Royal Water Garden, North Yorkshire, North-East England

    Abbey

    Fountains Abbey is one of the largest and best preserved ruined Cistercian monasteries in England.

    North-East England - North Yorkshire, Fountains, Ripon,

    Fountains Abbey is one of the largest and best preserved ruined Cistercian monasteries in England.

    It is located approximately 3 miles (5 kilometres) south-west of Ripon in North Yorkshire, near to the village of Aldfield. Founded in 1132, the abbey operated for over 400 years, until 1539, when Henry VIII ordered the Dissolution of the Monasteries.

    The abbey is a Grade-I-listed building owned by the National Trust and part of the designated Studley Royal Park including the Ruins of Fountains Abbey UNESCO World Heritage Site.

    After a dispute and riot in 1132 at the Benedictine house of St Mary's Abbey, in York, 13 monks were expelled (among them Saint Robert of Newminster) and, after unsuccessfully attempting to return to the early 6th-century Rule of St Benedict, were taken into the protection of Thurstan, Archbishop of York. He provided them with land in the valley of the River Skell, a tributary of the Ure. The enclosed valley had all the natural features needed for the creation of a monastery, providing shelter from the weather, stone and timber for building, and a supply of running water. After enduring a harsh winter in 1133, the monks applied to join the Cistercian order and in 1135 became the second house of that order in northern England, after Rievaulx.


     


  • Kirkham Priory - (EH)

    Kirkham Priory, North Yorkshire, North-East England

    Priory

    Sorry, this article is work in progress.

    North-East England - North Yorkshire

    Sorry, this article is work in progress. Please try an attraction along the East Cost - East Midlands, East of England, London or South-East England.

    Please read the 'About page' for more information.



  • Mount Grace Priory - (EH)

    Mount Grace Priory, North Yorkshire, North-East England

    Priory

    Sorry, this article is work in progress.

    North-East England - North Yorkshire

    Sorry, this article is work in progress. Please try an attraction along the East Cost - East Midlands, East of England, London or South-East England.

    Please read the 'About page' for more information.