Pevensey Castle, East Sussex, South-East England
© Manfred 960 on Flickr - (All rights reserved)
Beachy Head, East Sussex, South-East England
© Niko S90 on Flickr - (All rights reserved)
Beachy Head, East Sussex, South-East England
© Niko S90 on Flickr - (All rights reserved)
Belle Tout Lighthouse, Beachy Head, East Sussex, South-East England
© Manfred 960 on Flickr - (All rights reserved)
Bodiam Castle, East Sussex, South-East England
© Niko S90 on Flickr - (All rights reserved)
Scotney Castle & Garden, Kent, South-East England
© Niko S90 on Flickr - (All rights reserved)
Scotney Castle & Garden, Kent, South-East England
© Niko S90 on Flickr - (All rights reserved)
Scotney Castle & Garden, Kent, South-East England
© Niko S90 on Flickr - (All rights reserved)

Buckinghamshire

(Buccingahamscir)
Organisation colours:      NT      EH      HHA      Council, or privately owned     
  • Ascott - (NT)

    Ascott, Buckinghamshire, South-East England

    Historic House

    Ascott House, sometimes referred to as simply Ascott, is a Grade-II-listed building in the hamlet of Ascott near Wing in Buckinghamshire, England.

    South-East England - Buckinghamshire, Wing, near Leighton Buzzard

    Ascott House, sometimes referred to as simply Ascott, is a Grade-II-listed building in the hamlet of Ascott near Wing in Buckinghamshire, England.

    It is set in a 3,200-acre (1280 ha) estate.

    Ascott House was originally a farm house, built in the reign of James I, and known as "Ascott Hall". In 1873, it was acquired by Baron Mayer de Rothschild (of the neighbouring Mentmore Towers estate). The Rothschild family had begun to acquire vast tracts of land in Buckinghamshire earlier in the century, on which they built a series of large mansions from 1852 onwards. Baron Mayer gave the house at Ascott to his nephew, Leopold de Rothschild, who transformed it over the following decades into the substantial, but informal, country house it is today.



     


  • Bletchley Park

    Bletchley Park, Buckinghamshire, South-East England

    Historic House

    Bletchley Park was the central site for British codebreakers during World War II, in Milton Keynes, Buckinghamshire, England.

    South-East England - Buckinghamshire, Bletchley, Milton Keynes

    Bletchley Park was the central site for British codebreakers during World War II, in Milton Keynes, Buckinghamshire, England.

    It housed the Government Code and Cypher School (GC&CS), and it regularly penetrated the secret communications of the Axis Powers – most importantly the German Enigma and Lorenz ciphers. The official historian of World War II British Intelligence has written that the "Ultra" intelligence produced at Bletchley shortened the war by two to four years, and, that without it, the outcome of the war would have been uncertain.

    Bletchley Park is open to the public, and receives hundreds of thousands of visitors annually.


     


  • Boarstall Duck Decoy - (NT)

    Boarstall Duck Decoy, Buckinghamshire, South-East England

    Duck Decoy

    The Boarstall Duck Decoy is a 17th-century duck decoy located in Boarstall, Buckinghamshire, England, and now a National Trust property.

    South-East England - Buckinghamshire, Boarstall, near Bicester

    The Boarstall Duck Decoy is a 17th-century duck decoy located in Boarstall, Buckinghamshire, England, and now a National Trust property.

    At one time, a common sight in the English countryside, only four duck decoys now remain. The Boarstall Duck Decoy is still in working order, and is surrounded by 13 acres (52 ha) of natural woodland.

    The intent of the decoy was to catch large numbers of waterfowl. A decoy or fake duck was used to attract birds onto a small patch of water. The pond was equipped with a long cone-shaped wickerwork tunnel. A "decoyman" with a trained dog then herded the birds into the tunnel. Once the birds had been trapped in the tunnel, they could then be caught as required. Originally, the birds trapped here were a source of food.


     


  • Boarstall Tower - (NT)

    Boarstall Tower, Buckinghamshire, South-East England

    Tower

    l Trust property.

    According to legend, King Edward the Confessor gave some land to one of his men in return for slaying a wild boar that had infested the nearby Bernwood Forest. The man built himself a mansion on this land and called it "Boar-stall" (Old English for 'Boar House') in memory of the slain beast. The man, known as Neil, was also given a horn from the dead beast, and the legend says that whoever shall possess the horn shall be the lord of the manor of Boarstall.

    Closed for maintenance In 2017.

    South-East England - Buckinghamshire, Boarstall, near Bicester

    Boarstall Tower is a 14th-century moated gatehouse located in Boarstall, Buckinghamshire, England, and now, with its surrounding gardens, a National Trust property.

    According to legend, King Edward the Confessor gave some land to one of his men in return for slaying a wild boar that had infested the nearby Bernwood Forest. The man built himself a mansion on this land and called it "Boar-stall" (Old English for 'Boar House') in memory of the slain beast. The man, known as Neil, was also given a horn from the dead beast, and the legend says that whoever shall possess the horn shall be the lord of the manor of Boarstall.

    Closed for maintenance In 2017.



     


  • Bradwell Windmill, Milton Keynes

    Bradwell Windmill, Buckinghamshire, South-East England

    Windmill

    Bradwell Windmill is a limestone tower windmill built around 1805 adjacent to the Grand Union Canal for the supply of flour to the London market.

    South-East England - Buckinghamshire, Bradwell nr Milton Keynes

    Bradwell Windmill is a limestone tower windmill built around 1805 adjacent to the Grand Union Canal for the supply of flour to the London market.

    Bradwell Windmill is thought to be the second windmill built in Bradwell village, replacing an earlier post mill on the site of Summerfield School, which sat on a post in order that the whole structure could be turned, so the sails caught the wind.

    The mill has been restored recently to full working order and is producing flour.

    (National Mills Weekend 2019: Saturday 11th and Sunday 12th of May)
    (Please, always check if the mill is open to the public before your visit.)