Pevensey Castle, East Sussex, South-East England
© Manfred 960 on Flickr - (All rights reserved)
Beachy Head, East Sussex, South-East England
© Niko S90 on Flickr - (All rights reserved)
Beachy Head, East Sussex, South-East England
© Niko S90 on Flickr - (All rights reserved)
Belle Tout Lighthouse, Beachy Head, East Sussex, South-East England
© Manfred 960 on Flickr - (All rights reserved)
Bodiam Castle, East Sussex, South-East England
© Niko S90 on Flickr - (All rights reserved)
Scotney Castle & Garden, Kent, South-East England
© Niko S90 on Flickr - (All rights reserved)
Scotney Castle & Garden, Kent, South-East England
© Niko S90 on Flickr - (All rights reserved)
Scotney Castle & Garden, Kent, South-East England
© Niko S90 on Flickr - (All rights reserved)

West Sussex

Organisation colours:      NT      EH      HHA      Council, or privately owned     
  • Arundel Castle - (HHA), (heavily restored)

    Arundel Castle, West Sussex, South-East England

    Castle

    Arundel Castle is a restored and remodelled medieval castle in Arundel, West Sussex, England.

    South-East England - West Sussex, Arundel

    Arundel Castle is a restored and remodelled medieval castle in Arundel, West Sussex, England.

    It was established by Roger de Montgomery on Christmas Day 1068. Roger became the first to hold the Earldom of Arundel by the graces of William the Conqueror. The castle was damaged in the English Civil War and then restored in the 18th and 19th centuries.

    From the 11th century, the castle has served as a home and has been in the ownership of the family of the Duke of Norfolk for over 400 years. It is the principal seat of the Norfolk family. It is a Grade-I-listed building.

    The original structure was a motte-and-double-bailey castle. Roger de Montgomery was declared the first Earl of Arundel as the King granted him the property as part of a much larger package of hundreds of manors.


     


  • Black Down - (NT)

    Black Down, West Sussex, South-East England

    Down

    Black Down in West Sussex is a landscape of wavy-hair grass, purple heather and pine trees, where you can still get a true sense of 'wild'.

    South-East England - West Sussex, Haslemere

    Black Down in West Sussex is a landscape of wavy-hair grass, purple heather and pine trees, where you can still get a true sense of 'wild'.

    The views have inspired many for years and none so renowned as Tennyson himself: ‘You came and looked and loved the view, long known and loved by me, Green Sussex fading into blue with one grey glimpse of sea.’

    As you amble down some of the ancient sunken lanes and drove ways, you can feel a sense of timelessness. Traders, shepherds and chert quarrymen have been using these tracks for thousands of years.



  • Blackcap - (NT)

    Blackcap, West Sussex, South-East England

    Nature Reserve

    ngland.

    It is also, mainly, part of the Clayton to Offham Escarpment SSSI. The reserve contains the hills of Blackcap, 206 metres (676 ft), in the parish of East Chiltington, Mount Harry, 196 metres (643 ft), in the parish of Hamsey and the wooded area of Ashcombe Bottom in the parish of St John Without.#more

    Walks can be taken, starting low down by the road at the North, and then climbing steadily south up to the ridge, where there are spectacular view southwards. The flatter landscape is made up of scrubby open ground with chalk paths, surrounded by thickets (home to many songbirds, especially blue tits and common chaffinches). The steeper ground leading up to the ridge is low-density woodland. The top is very open, with patches of pine woodland and gorse bushes, and there is a triangulation point here.#more

    The flat surrounding fields are grazed by sheep, and the surrounding hillsides are so stubbly and coarse that Exmoor ponies are brought in to graze them. Carrion crows often fly overhead, and the scrub is densely populated by rabbits. Roe deer come out when it is quiet to graze, hidden and protected by the surrounding thickets.

    South-East England - West Sussex, nr. Offham, Lewes

    Blackcap is a National Trust owned area of countryside on the peak of the South Downs, just south-east of the village of Plumpton in East Sussex, England.

    It is also, mainly, part of the Clayton to Offham Escarpment SSSI. The reserve contains the hills of Blackcap, 206 metres (676 ft), in the parish of East Chiltington, Mount Harry, 196 metres (643 ft), in the parish of Hamsey and the wooded area of Ashcombe Bottom in the parish of St John Without.


     


  • Borde Hill Garden - (HHA)

    Borde Hill Garden, West Sussex, South-East England

    Garden

    Borde Hill Garden is a garden located 1.

    South-East England - West Sussex, Haywards Heath

    Borde Hill Garden is a garden located 1.5 miles (2.4 km) north of Haywards Heath, West Sussex in southern England.

    It is set in over 200 acres (80 ha) of garden, park and woodlands, accompanied by spectacular views across the Sussex High Weald.

    Borde Hill Garden is planted in distinctive “living garden rooms”, each offering a different character and style. It is home to many fine and rare shrubs: from rhododendrons, azaleas and magnolias to roses, as well as numerous trees, including one of the best collections of champion trees in a private property in Britain (82 specimens as of 2013).


     


  • Boxgrove Priory and Church (nearby) - (EH)

    Boxgrove Priory and Church, West Sussex, South-East England

    Priory

    Boxgrove Priory, in the village of Boxgrove in Sussex, was founded in about 1066 by Robert de Haye, who, in 1105, bestowed the church of St.

    South-East England - West Sussex, Boxgrove

    Boxgrove Priory, in the village of Boxgrove in Sussex, was founded in about 1066 by Robert de Haye, who, in 1105, bestowed the church of St. Mary of Boxgrove upon the Benedictine Abbey of Lessay.

    In about 1126, upon the marriage of Robert's daughter Cecily to Roger St. John, the number of monks living at Boxgrove was increased from the original three to six, and by 1187, there were a total of fifteen. The nineteenth monk was added to the priory in about 1230 by William de Kainesham, Canon of Chichester. By 1535, the priory's possessions were worth £185 19s. 8d. gross, and £145 10s. 2½d. clear.