Pendennis Castle, Cornwall, South-West England
© Nilfanion - (CC BY-SA 3.0)
Tindagel Castle, Cornwall, South-West England
© I, Rawac - (CC BY-SA 3.0)

Castles, Forts & Towers of Cornwall

(Westwealas)
Organisation colours:      NT      EH      HHA      Council, or privately owned     
  • Caerhays Castle - (HHA), (intact)

    Caerhays Castle, Cornwall, South-West England

    Castle

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    South-West England - Cornwall

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  • Pendennis Castle - (EH), (intact)

    Pendennis Castle, Cornwall, South-West England

    Castle

    Pendennis Castle (Cornish: Kastel Penndinas) is one of Henry VIII's Device Forts, or Henrician castle, in the English county of Cornwall.

    South-West England - Cornwall, Falmouth,

    Pendennis Castle (Cornish: Kastel Penndinas) is one of Henry VIII's Device Forts, or Henrician castle, in the English county of Cornwall.

    It was built between 1539 - 1545 for King Henry VIII to guard the entrance to the River Fal on its west bank, near Falmouth. St Mawes Castle is its opposite number on the east bank and they were built to defend Carrick Roads from the French and Spanish threats of future attack. The castle comprises a simple round tower and gate enclosed by a lower curtain wall. It is now in the care of English Heritage.

    Pendennis Castle was built as one of a chain of forts running along the coast of the southern half of Britain from Hull to Milford Haven. This was in response to the threat of invasion to Henry VIII from the French and Spanish. Henry had changed the religion of England to Church of England so he could get a divorce, money and more power over his country.



     


  • Saint Michael's Mount - (HHA)

    Saint Michael's Mount, Cornwall, South-West England

    Castle

    St Michael's Mount is a small tidal island in Mount's Bay, Cornwall, England, United Kingdom.

    South-West England - Cornwall, Marazion

    St Michael's Mount is a small tidal island in Mount's Bay, Cornwall, England, United Kingdom.

    The island is a civil parish and is linked to the town of Marazion by a man-made causeway of granite setts, passable between mid-tide and low water. The population of this parish in 2011 was 35. It is managed by the National Trust, and the castle and chapel have been the home of the St Aubyn family since approximately 1650. The earliest buildings, on the summit, date to the 12th century.

    Its Cornish language name – literally, "the grey rock in a wood" – may represent a folk memory of a time before Mount's Bay was flooded, indicating a description of the mount set in woodland. Remains of trees have been seen at low tides following storms on the beach at Perranuthnoe. Radiocarbon dating established the submerging of the hazel wood at about 1700 BC.

    Historically, St Michael's Mount was a Cornish counterpart of Mont Saint-Michel in Normandy, France (with which it shares the same tidal island characteristics and the same conical shape, in spite of being much smaller), when it was given to the Benedictine religious order of Mont Saint-Michel by Edward the Confessor in the 11th century. .. more


     


  • Tintagel Castle - (EH), (fragmented remains)

    Tintagel Castle, Cornwall, South-West England

    Castle

    jacent to the village of Tintagel in Cornwall, England, in the United Kingdom.

    The site was possibly occupied in the Romano-British period, as an array of artefacts dating to this period have been found on the peninsula, but as yet no Roman era structure has been proved to have existed there. It subsequently saw settlement during the Early Medieval period, when it was probably one of the seasonal residences of the regional king of Dumnonia. In the 13th century, during the Later Medieval period, after Cornwall had been subsumed into the kingdom of England, a castle was built on the site by Richard, Earl of Cornwall, which later fell into disrepair and ruin.

    Archaeological investigation into the site began in the 19th century as it became a tourist attraction, with visitors coming to see the ruins of Richard's castle. In the 1930s, excavations revealed significant traces of a much earlier high status settlement, which had trading links with the Mediterranean during the Late Roman period.#more

    South-West England - Cornwall, Tintagel

    Tintagel Castle (Cornish: Dintagel, meaning "fort of the constriction") is a medieval fortification located on the peninsula of Tintagel Island, adjacent to the village of Tintagel in Cornwall, England, in the United Kingdom.

    The site was possibly occupied in the Romano-British period, as an array of artefacts dating to this period have been found on the peninsula, but as yet no Roman era structure has been proved to have existed there. It subsequently saw settlement during the Early Medieval period, when it was probably one of the seasonal residences of the regional king of Dumnonia. In the 13th century, during the Later Medieval period, after Cornwall had been subsumed into the kingdom of England, a castle was built on the site by Richard, Earl of Cornwall, which later fell into disrepair and ruin.

    Archaeological investigation into the site began in the 19th century as it became a tourist attraction, with visitors coming to see the ruins of Richard's castle. In the 1930s, excavations revealed significant traces of a much earlier high status settlement, which had trading links with the Mediterranean during the Late Roman period. .. more