East Riding of Yorkshire

Organisation colours:      NT      EH      HHA      Council, or privately owned     
  • Burton Agnes Manor House - (EH)

    Burton Agnes Manor House, East Riding of Yorkshire, Yorkshire and Humber

    Manor House

    Burton Agnes Hall is an Elizabethan manor house in the village of Burton Agnes, near Driffield in the East Riding of Yorkshire, England.

    Yorkshire and Humber - East Riding of Yorkshire, Burton Agnes, Driffield

    Burton Agnes Hall is an Elizabethan manor house in the village of Burton Agnes, near Driffield in the East Riding of Yorkshire, England.

    It was built by Sir Henry Griffith in 1601–10 to designs attributed to Robert Smythson. The older Norman Burton Agnes Manor House, originally built in 1173, still stands on an adjacent site; both buildings are now Grade-I-listed buildings.

    The Hall contains a number of fine 17th-century plaster ceilings and chimneypieces. The ceiling of the Long Gallery was restored, in two stages, by Francis Johnson between 1951 and 1974. The plan attributed to John Smythson presents a square block with bay windows and a small internal courtyard. All of the display has been concentrated on the entrance facade, which includes many windows and many shaped projecting bays, two square flanking the central entrance, two semicircular at the ends of the projecting wings, and two five-sided around the corners. Variety in the skyline is created by gables alternating with level parapets.



     


  • Howden Minster - (EH)

    Howden Minster, East Riding of Yorkshire, Yorkshire and Humber

    Minster

    Howden Minster is a large Grade-I-listed Church of England church in the Diocese of York.

    Yorkshire and Humber - East Riding of Yorkshire, Howden

    Howden Minster is a large Grade-I-listed Church of England church in the Diocese of York. It is located in Howden, East Riding of Yorkshire, England.

    It is one of the largest and most magnificent churches in the East Riding of Yorkshire. It is dedicated to St Peter and St Paul, and it is, therefore, properly known as 'the Minster Church of St Peter and St Paul'. Its Grade-I-listed status also includes the Chapter House.

    Howden Minster was owned by monks from Peterborough Abbey in Saxon times, but in 1080, it was gifted to William of Calais (Bishop of Durham). Although dependent on Durham, the minster was in the Diocese of York. Rebuilding the Norman church in the Early English Style seems to have been begun in 1228. It became a Collegiate Church in 1267. Rebuilding work was completed in the Decorated Style around 1340. A small octagonal Chapter House was built after 1388, the last of its kind to be built in England. The church survived the Dissolution of the Monasteries, as it was not a monastery, but fell victim to the Dissolution of Collegiate Churches and Chantries in 1548. .. more


     


  • Skipsea Castle - (EH), (earthworks)

    Skipsea Castle, East Riding of Yorkshire, Yorkshire and Humber

    Castle

    Skipsea Castle was a Norman motte-and-bailey castle near the village of Skipsea, East Riding of Yorkshire, England.

    Yorkshire and Humber - East Riding of Yorkshire, nr Skipsea

    Skipsea Castle was a Norman motte-and-bailey castle near the village of Skipsea, East Riding of Yorkshire, England.

    Built around 1086 by Drogo de la Beuvrière, apparently on the remains of an Iron Age mound, it was designed to secure the newly conquered region, defend against any potential Danish invasion and control the trade route across the region leading to the North Sea. The motte and the bailey were separated by Skipsea Mere, an artificial lake that was linked to the sea, during the medieval period, via a navigable channel. The village of Skipsea grew up beside the castle church, and the fortified town of Skipsea Brough was built alongside the castle, around 1160, to capitalise on the potential trade. .. more


     


  • Sledmere House

    Sledmere House, East Riding of Yorkshire, Yorkshire and Humber

    Historic House

    Sledmere House is a Grade-I-listed Georgian country house, containing Chippendale, Sheraton and French furnishings, and many fine pictures.

    Yorkshire and Humber - East Riding of Yorkshire, Sledmere, Driffield

    Sledmere House is a Grade-I-listed Georgian country house, containing Chippendale, Sheraton and French furnishings, and many fine pictures. It is set within a park designed by Capability Brown.

    It is located in the village of Sledmere, between Driffield and Malton, in the East Riding of Yorkshire, England. The present house was begun in 1751, extended in the 1790s, and rebuilt after a fire in 1911. It was once the home of Sir Mark Sykes, noted English traveller and diplomatic advisor, and is now the home of Sir Tatton Sykes, 8th Baronet.

    A catastrophic fire in 1911 left the building a shell and destroyed the Adam-style 1790s interiors. It is said that Sir Tatton Sykes, 5th Baronet, was too busy eating one of the milk puddings to which he was addicted to pay much attention, but villagers and estate workers loyally rescued pictures, statues and furniture, china and carpets, and even doors and banisters, including the house's 1780 copy of the Belvedere Apollo. The roof fell in a few moments later. The original designs for the interiors had survived however, and the house was then restored. Sir Mark Sykes, 6th Baronet inherited the estate after his father.